Book review: Powder Days — by Heather Hansman

You know ski season is right around the corner when the ski films drop, but this year, a ski book has dropped, so let’s go, let it snow.

Book review: All the Feels — by Olivia Dade

Romance novels, as a genre, are enjoying a resurgence — the guarantee of a happy ending can make the experience of reading one very relaxing and enjoyable in stressful times.

Book review: A Line to Kill — by Anthony Horowitz

The third Hawthorne and Horowitz Mystery, this whodunnit may be my favorite in the series.

Book review: Swamplands: Tundra beavers, quaking bogs and the improbable world of peat — by Edward Struzik

Tamarack trees, which grow in peatland forests and also on islands of mounded peat, need 300 years to reach seven feet in height.

Book review: The Death of Jane Lawrence — by Caitlin Starling

Jane Shoringfield is a pragmatic woman with a head for figures; she’s been keeping the accounts for her guardians, the kindly couple who took her in after the death of her parents in the recent war, but it is time for Jane to make her own way.

Book review: Sankofa — by Chibundu Onuzo

Anna Graham, with an unsteady marriage, a fully-grown independent daughter, and a mother recently passed, is now uncovering her past and figuring out who she is.

Book review: My Monticello — by Jocelyn Nicole Johnson

In the titular novella, Black children, the elderly, innocent families are forced from their homes in a wave of violence and destruction.

Book review: Shelf Life: Chronicles of a Cairo Bookseller — Nadia Wassef

In 2002, Nadia Wassef, along with four business partners, one of them her sister, opened Diwan Bookstore in Cairo, Egypt, the flagship store of what was to become, and is, a successful chain of bookstores and the leading seller of English and Arabic books … (read more)

Book review: Harlem Shuffle — by Colson Whitehead

This is the Harlem of the 1960s, crucible of the Civil Rights Movement.

Book review: Bewilderment — by Richard Powers

When astrobiologist Theo Byrne loses his wife, the center of his universe, he is left, seemingly without the proper tools in his arsenal, to single-parent Robin, the child named after his mother’s favorite bird.

Book review: Bewilderment — by Richard Powers

(W. W. Norton & Company)When astrobiologist Theo Byrne loses his wife, the center of his universe, he is left, seemingly without the proper tools in his arsenal, to single-parent Robin, the child named after his mother’s favorite bird. Robin is “sensitive … (read more)

Book review: Graceland, At Last — by Margaret Renkl

(Milkweed Editions)Hopeful, tender, honest and vulnerable — the essays written by Margaret Renkl (Late Migrations) and published in her op-ed column in the New York Times — that is what they are and more. I love her substance and style. It’s personal with … (read more)

Book review: Poet Warrior — by Joy Harjo

(W. W. Norton & Company)In Joy Harjo’s second memoir, the poet, author, musician, playwright, and first Native American to serve as the U.S. poet laureate, reveals, in illuminating detail, the many and varied influences and confluences that came to guide … (read more)

Book review: The Guide — by Peter Heller

(Knopf Publishing Group)If you read “The River” by Peter Heller, you will have a good idea of just what kind of literary territory you are venturing into — polished prose, erudite literary references, realistic characterizations, and high outdoor adventur … (read more)

Book review: Damnation Spring — by Ash Davidson

(Scribner)Be prepared to fall hard, fast and deep for the people who inhabit this debut novel by Ash Davidson as they navigate changing livelihoods, a changing climate, and changing families. Rich Gundersen, his wife Colleen, and their son Chub, make thei … (read more)

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