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Activities around town for May 28

VERMONT’S SUMMER FREE Fishing Day will be on Saturday, June 13 this year, which is also opening day of Vermont’s regular bass fishing season.

Visit virtual Edgewater Gallery. Both Edgewater Galleries in Middlebury are opening doors to the public under social distancing restrictions. For those still uncomfortable with venturing out in public, virtual exhibits will be available at edgewatergallery.com. “Reflections,” a group exhibition featuring artists Kathleen Kolb, Lori Mehta and Karen O’Neil, will be on view for the months of June and July at Edgewater Gallery on the Green, at 6 Merchants Row, Middlebury. “Three Summer Solos at the Falls,” three solo exhibitions from painters Hannah Bureau, Sara Katz and Jill Matthews, will also on view for the months of June and July at 1 Mill St., Middlebury. 
Go fish for free. Vermont’s annual, statewide Summer Free Fishing Day is Saturday, June 13, which will also be opening day of the regular bass fishing season. Free Fishing Day gives anglers the opportunity to go fishing without a license for the day in Vermont lakes and streams. The bass season opens each year on the second Saturday in June and extends through the last day of November. 
To learn more about fishing in Vermont or to purchase a fishing license, visit vtfishandwildlife.com. The 2020 “Fishing Guide & Regulations” book is available free from license agents, and an online version is on the department’s website.
Remember Middlebury’s 1893 train wreck. In the early morning hours of May 5, 1893, the railroad trestle that crossed Otter Creek at the bottom of Water Street collapsed. Thanks to the Sheldon Museum, this week you can take a look at the 1893 Middlebury train wreck in the lecture “A Story of Weight — The Otter Creek Trestle Collapse of 1893,” by Danielle Rougeau, president of the Sheldon Museum Board. Rougeau gave the lecture in January at Bundle. Link to the lecture at tinyurl.com/middtrainwreck.  
Make It Together: Handful of Flowers.
Materials Needed
•  Green or light-green colored paper
•  Various colored papers — magazines or construction paper
•  Cotton-tipped swabs
•  Food coloring, water-color paint set, or bingo dot-markers 
•  Glue or glue stick
•  Markers, pens or crayons 
•  Scissors
•  Paper towels
•  Plastic container lids or plates
Step 1: Trace around your hand onto green paper. 
Step 2: Cut out the shape and glue to the paper you choose for the background (towards the bottom third of the paper may work best. This gives you five stems to work on).
Step 3: If you are using food coloring, fold up several layers of paper towels to make a stamp pad of sorts (one pad for each color). Set on a plastic lid or plate for protecting your work surface. 
Step 4: Put 3-4 drops of water on the center of the pad, and add drops of food coloring to make the pad usable. If you are using water-color sets, activate the colors you wish with several drops of water.
Step 5: Using a cotton swab for each color, make a large dot in the center of each finger-tip ending. Then, make a ring of colored dots around this flower center — the petals. The bingo-dot markers can be used as they are, once you take the tops off — same process.
Test your global savvy. The Vermont Council on World Affairs kicks off its Virtual International Trivia Nights Thursday, May 28. Test your knowledge of all things global — geography, sports, international relations, and many other sorts of random world facts.
There will be three opportunities to participate. Attend one or all three: May 28, June 4 and June 11.
The winner from the final game, on June 11 will advance on to a National Online Competition, to be held the week of June 15, where they will compete against champions from other councils across the country. Registration is donate what you can and can be found at tinyurl.com/world-trivia.
Make It Together: Paper Pots
Materials: Stack of old newspapers, scissors, one empty 6-ounce can tomato paste or other small can.
Instructions:
1. Grab two pages of newspapers (so you have a four-sheet stack). Cut them into thirds lengthwise, giving you three long strips.
2. On the end closest to you, lay the can on its side across the strip of newspaper. Leave about 1 inch hanging off the end of the can.
3. Roll the can along the newspaper until it’s loosely wrapped all the way around. (Loose being key for easy removal of the can later.) Use tape to fasten the side.
4. Fold the edges of the newspaper down over the can, and work your way around in a circle until all the edges are folded over firmly. They don’t have to be perfect; you can just smush the paper down with your fingers. It’s also fine if there is a small hole where the folds meet in the middle — that just provides extra drainage.
5. Flip the can over so the folded edges are now on the bottom. Press the can down on the folds to really crease the edges against the bottom of the can. You can decorate the paper or put the name of what you’re planting on the outside.
6. Slide the can out. You now have a thrifty and biodegradable seedling pot!

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