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State seeks halt to outdoor burning through May

BRISTOL — State officials are asking that the public postpone all outdoor burning through at least May 30, as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. Open burning creates the risk of an escaped fire and puts pressure on emergency personnel. 
The town of Bristol, for instance, this week announced that, effective immediately, the fire warden had issued a temporary ban on all burn permits until further notice. Along with the Bristol Fire Department, the warden announced a temporary ban on open burning in order reduce the risk of wildland fires during covid-19 emergency. 
With the state of Vermont currently experiencing the community-wide spread of COVID-19, the fire warden and fire chief’s goal is to minimize any additional pressure on Bristol’s emergency personnel both in terms of response and unnecessary potential contact with people who may have COVID-19.  
Traditionally, the months of April and May have been both the most active in terms of requests for burn permits and emergency personnel dealing with wildland fires. These two months have often been some of the driest, which adds to the potential risk associated with wildland fire incidents.  
The fire warden and fire chief ask for residents’ understanding and consideration during these unprecedented times. They also note that there is an exception for campfires: A person is not required to have a permit for a campfire (any fire for cooking or warming) on their own land.
 

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